Image Guided Biopsy

Stereotactic Breast Biopsy

Breast biopsy is performed to determine whether an abnormal development in the breast is benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). A stereotactic biopsy is performed when the abnormal area in the breast cannot be felt. In Stereotactic Biopsy, a special mammography machine is used to guide the radiologist to the tumor with the use of x-rays. A local anesthetic is used to minimize any discomfort from the biopsy.

Preparation for exam:

You should mention if you are using any type of medication or herbal supplements to your technologists or doctor.  If you are allergic to any kind of local anesthetic please inform you technologist or doctor.

Length of exam:

Length of exam varies from 30 to 60 minutes.

After your exam:

  • No heavy lifting within 24 hours after your exam.
  • Once the tissue is obtained it is sent to the pathologist to be examined.
  • A Diversified Radiologist will interpret your images and a report will be sent to your referring physician.

Ultrasound Guided Biopsy

Breast biopsy is performed to determine whether an abnormal development in the breast is benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Using an ultrasound probe to visualize the location of the breast lump, the radiologist inserts a biopsy needle into the breast to remove tissue samples.  This is done under local anesthetic.   Image guided, minimally invasive procedures such as ultrasound-guided breast biopsy are performed by a sub-specialist in radiology.

Preparation for exam:

You should mention if you are using any type of medication or herbal supplements to your technologists or doctor.  If you are allergic to any kind of local anesthetic please inform you technologist or doctor.

Length of exam:

Length of exam typically lasts 30 – 45 minutes.

After your exam:

  • No heavy lifting within 24 hours after your exam.
  • A Diversified Radiologist will interpret your images and a report will be sent to your referring physician usually within 24 hours of your test.

MRI Guided Biopsy

When an abnormality is noted on an MRI, then an ultrasound and/or a mammogram is/are usually done to determine whether there is a corresponding abnormality that can be seen with these more simple techniques. If there is nothing seen on the mammography or ultrasound, and the area found on MRI is considered worrisome, then a biopsy will be recommended using MRI guidance.

The patient is placed on her abdomen on the MRI table, with her breasts mildly compressed in the specially fitted coils. The patient is then transported on this table into the MRI unit and an initial scan is taken after injecting MRI contrast/’dye’, to localize the area to be biopsied.

The patient is then transported outside of the MRI unit, and, with her remaining in position, the area is numbed with local anesthetic. The injection of local anesthetic is slightly uncomfortable, but subsides quickly. A special biopsy needle is placed in the breast and after returning the patient to the MRI unit, additional scans confirm satisfactory positioning.

The patient is then transported out of the MRI unit again, and the biopsy is performed. A small inert metal clip is placed to mark the site of the biopsy. All MRI guided biopsies require the placement of a clip. Scans are done after the procedure to confirm a satisfactory biopsy.

Preparation for exam

You should mention if you are using any type of medication or herbal supplements to your technologists or doctor.  If you are allergic to any kind of local anesthetic please inform you technologist or doctor.

Length of exam:

MRI guided biopsies typically last between 1 and 1 1/2 hours.

After your exam:

  • No heavy lifting within 24 hours after your exam.
  • A Diversified Radiologist will interpret your images and a report will be sent to your referring physician usually within 24 hours of your test.

Medical technology changes rapidly and although this website is frequently updated, some information may not be current. Diversified Radiology of Colorado, P. C. assumes no liability for any damages resulting from information contained on this site. If you have any questions regarding medical information on this site or any linked sites, we recommend you contact your primary care physician.